Rumpetroll: Interactive Website of the Week

Rumpetroll is fantastic in its utilization of social media in an interactive HTML5 environment.  Twitter users become little tadpoles who swim in an infinitely vast pond, moving by pressing their mouse and able to communicate with other twitter users they pass via typing.  Think of it as a blend of Twitter and Chat Roulette, with more user navigation and simple, straight-forward design.  Aren’t we all just tadpoles in a big pond after all?  Visit the site here.

Source: Rumpetroll

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Interactive Website of the Week: BLA BLA Draws you into its Character-based Story

It was kind of tough coming up with a title for this one-How do you even begin describe Bla Bla? For starters, it came away from SXSW with an Interactive award for the art category, so you know it’s good. The non-linear story is broken up into numbered segments, and the story progresses once you extinguish your clicking options or decide you’re bored and force the progression by clicking on the next segment’s number. However, I found that these storylines are perfectly timed out even for the ADD-riddled brain. You won’t be bored!

Since there’s no clear plot or narration, it’s tough to tell exactly what it is that draws you into this site. One thing that’s surely responsible is the character, who displays from the start a wide range of emotions. As a participant, you start to wonder how much control you have over this big-headed little guy and how he’s going to react to your initially apathetic clicks. Yet as the chapters progress, your clicks become more and more sympathetic, as you start to care about him just a little bit. Will this click make him angry? Maybe. Will this click make him happy? There’s only one way to know for sure.

One thing I really liked about this project is how easy it is to navigate–you never get the feeling that you’ve left a stone unturned. Since the content itself is non-linear, it was important for Vince Morriset to make a linear structure in which the story could be told. This kept me from getting frustrated, which is a common experience for interactive websites that don’t provide any direction or site map. Well executed, sir! Now everyone, go experience Bla Bla here.

If you’d like to read more about it after trying out Bla Bla for yourself, click here to visit the Canadian Animation Interviews blog.  Here are some more stills from my playtime:

Source: Bla Bla

Interactive Website of Last Week: Interactive Music Video “Lights” with Ellie Goulding

Besides the fact that my browser hated me for loading this interactive site and crashed with about 30 seconds left in the “Lights” experience, this piece is extraordinary.  It’s everything you wanted that swirling-lights Mac screensaver to be, plus way more (hence the reason I had to double my weekly website find-sometimes ya gotta!).  Take control of the mouse and dive into this visual landscape of color and motion-while of course listening to the fantastic vocal stylings of Ellie Goulding’s lights.  Would love to see this up on a projector with some big speakers blasting heavy bass. Like the one I just posted, this project came away from SXSW Interactive with an award for the Motion Graphics category. All the credit goes to HelloEnjoy, a company that “creates high-end interactive 3d for the web and mobile.” Here are some stills from my experience:

Interactive Website of the Week: Facebook Stalker Offers You Razor-Filled Lollipop

“Take this Lollipop” won the Experimental category at this years SXSW interactive awards, and all with good reason: it challenges your beliefs on social networking and privacy while both humoring and scaring the living crap out of you. Here’s the trailer:

All you have to do is go to www.takethislollipop.com, allow momentary access to your Facebook (you can trust these people, they won at SXSW for christ’s sake), and then sit back and watch as the next minute sends chills up your spine.  You won’t believe your eyes.  It’s an editing and interactive feat directed by Jason Zada.  I wonder what Mark Zuckerberg thought of this.