How Vimeo went Interactive with Old Spice’s “Muscle Music” Video

The latest thing to go viral is Old Spice’s “Muscle Music” video (above), where after watching an impressive display of musical flexing, users can play their own muscle-y tunes by pressing keyboard keys.  Old Spice has always had incredible advertising, but this interactive Weiden + Kennedy video brings a fresh perspective to the brand.

 Interested in how this was done, I came across The Atlantic’s interview with Abby Morgan, Vimeo’s Senior Manager of Strategic Sales Partnerships.  Here’s what The Atlantic, had to say, according to author Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg:

“Wieden came to Vimeo back in June, and together they worked with the visual effects shop The Mill to produce the spot. Asked why Wieden selected Vimeo over other video platforms, Morgan explains, ‘I think it was because we were willing to work with them throughout the entire process of ideation, creation, production … because we were willing to take the journey and step into the trenches with the creative process.’ In addition to the live video recording of Crews, the video is a composite of over 150 different elements. While the Flash player runs through the music video, it loads the interactive portion, which is ‘effectively a new player.’ The real triumph, Morgan says, was figuring out how to speed up the server-side compositing of 150 moving parts so that users could record and save their own Muscle Music videos. The process they came up with is surprisingly fast; watch the progress bar load and it just gleefully declares ‘COMPUTER STUFF HAPPENING!'” (The Atlantic)

Source: The Atlantic



Heineken Didn’t Think Lego-like Beer Bottles Were Cool 50 years ago


I don’t know many adults who feel “too old” to play with LEGOS, but if that sounds like you, check out Heineken’s beer bottle building bricks from 1963.  You can’t get your hands on one now–they only made it to a prototype phase– but it’s worth reading how Alfred “Freddy” Heineken attempted to eradicate homelessness with the invention of these stackable bottles. See below for pictures of real houses built using the Heineken World Bottle “WOBO” blocks.

Reposted from Laughing Squid:

“In 1963, Alfred “Freddy” Heineken visited the Caribbean island of Curaçao and noted two issues: the lack of building materials for the island’s lower class and the excess of bottles littering their beaches. In response, he connected with Dutch architect N. John Habraken and the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle) was invented. The WOBO is a Heineken-branded beer bottle that doubles as a stackable, self-aligning and interlocking brick made for building eco-homes. One thousand WOBO bricks would be needed to make a simple 10 X 10 foot structure. According to Wikipedia, almost every bottle has been destroyed and only two remaining WOBO structures exist “and they are both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk, near Amsterdam…””


And last but not least, Laughing Squid brought up that Heineken actually did revisit their rectangular roots, but for saving fridge space rather than saving the poor and homeless (and possibly alcoholic): meet the 2008 Heineken cube.


All images from Laughing Squid.




Interactive Vending Machine Reveals how low People Will go for Free Food

I’ve got mixed feelings about this one: is getting people to bow down to your product the most awesome thing ever, or just plain humiliating?  Personally, I’m embarrassed for all of the people in the video below.  Except for the grandmotherly lady who takes the initiative and hits the button 100 times for her free rice snack.

So what is this thing? It’s Australia’s Fantastic Delites new marketing campaign produced by Clemenger BBDO called “How far will you go for Fantastic Delites?”  As you’ll see below, people go very far indeed.  Dancing, literally getting on their knees and bowing to the machine, doing the chicken dance, pressing the button 100, 1000, and even 5000 times–it’s degradation at its best.  For rice snacks. RICE snacks, people! Does that even sound worth it to you?  For better or for worse, our opinions actually don’t matter because the video shows that type of marketing to be effective –just look at all the crowds!  I think a major part of the appeal is just that–it draws a crowd and attracts attention.  People stop what they are doing to watch another human make a fool of his or herself.  And then of course they become curious, what is this thing, what’s it for, who is Fantastic Delites, and maybe I want one.

This is a fantastic example of interactivity in marketing.  It’s pushing the limits of human-machine interaction, all while making a name for Fantastic Delites not just at its location, but around the world because of that video.  I’m impressed.  And slightly repulsed.  But mostly impressed.

Source: AdWeek

Webby Awards 2012 Showcase Best Interactive Websites

The 2012 Webby Awards showcase some of world’s best, most innovative media projects. Check out my favorites below, browse their websites, and participate!  Each of the following projects was nominated for an Interactive Webby Award in one of the following areas: Augmented Reality, Banner Campaigns, Banner Singles, Best Copywriting, Best Integrated Media Plan, Best use of Online Media, Best use of Social Media, and … ok there are quite a few more, but I think you get the point (or a full list of these categories click here).

“The Inside Experience”  Interactive Advertising Campaign for Intel and Toshiba

SPENT – Interactive Advertising for Urban Ministries of Durham by McKinney

Red Bull Formula Face” – Video Game Advertising for Red Bull by Buzzed Monkey

This one is a favorite – I bet Mario Kart makers are kicking themselves for not doing it first.  You control your gokart’s movements by small facial movements. And you were wondering why your coworker is making strange expressions today…

Dear 16 Year Old Me – David Cornfield Melanoma Fund Advertising by Evidently

Androp “Bell” – Interactive Music Video

I’m a huge fan of interactive music videos, even though I was awful at the above mentioned game.  Which brings us to the point where it’s necessary to mention Biophilia, Bjork’s interactive album that, being an app, is the first of its kind.  I have yet to actually download and try out the app, so more on that later.  For now, you can have a taste of the interaction by going to Bjork’s site:

“The Chase” Nexus Productions by Smith & Foulkes

“It will never be the same” – SOMA by Proximity Colombia

As a way to make marketing and promo emails more relevant, SOMA created 15 hours of music, art, and technology in an email.  As a result of their interactive emails, more emails were opened than before and way many more links were clicked in those emails.  Good job guys for making spam more fun to read!

All of these projects lead me to ask a question: what is the difference between entertainment and advertising in the 21st century?  The line begins to blur…think about it. What are you selling, and what do people actually want?  Can you make them the same?