Night Bright Interactive Installation of Nocturnal Discovery

Night Bright is an interactive installation where children physically interact with an imaginary nocturnal ecosystem.  As explained by creator Design I/O:

“Night Bright is an interactive installation of nocturnal discovery where children use their bodies to light up the nighttime forest and discover the creatures that inhabit it.  Listening to the creatures’ sounds children can locate them in the forest, as they play a nighttime game of hide and seek.  Some creatures are curious and will investigate the light, while others are frightened and will hide in the shadows.  Using their light, children can grow nocturnal plants and release fireflies from their flowers.  The fireflies illuminate the environment and help locate the creatures hiding in the forest.
Night Bright was created for the Bumble children’s cafe in Los Altos, California.

Music for the video documentation courtesy of Diederik Idenburg / MOST Original Soundtracks.” (Design I/O)

 

Source: All images from Design I/O.

Advertisements

3D Holographic Displays Grace the Markets thanks to RealFiction

Dreamoc mixes 3D motion graphics with real objects or no objects at all to create a stunning holographic display.  Marketed commercially, Dreamoc is made by Denmark-based company RealFiction to advertise retail.  Leave it to the Scandinavians! This kind of technology holds great possibilities for the arts and experiential realms as well.  Eager to find out more information on how exactly they use the glass pyramid to create a 3D holographic illusion.

Check out this demo video:

 

Markus Pritzi’s Fashion Spread uses Human Mapping

Image

“Electric Kool-Aid Acid” features Ilva Hetmann posing for human mapping projections in the February issue of Interview Germany.  Designed by Markus Pritzi, the editorial features this season’s patterns and prints.

Image

Image

Image

ImageImageImageImageImage

Source: Interview Germany

Interactive Website of the Week: Ana Somnia

Image

This interactive website is the coolest, freshest thing I’ve seen in a long time.  It uses a webcam to detect levels of light in your room, and once you turn off the lights (assumedly to go to sleep) your character’s head explodes with dreams.  Don’t cheat though–or you might wake up in the middle of your REM cycle.

Here’s a visual walkthrough, but if you’d prefer to be surprised click here to experience it firsthand.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

And if you turn on a light (or in my case, moved your hand from blocking the webcam):

Image

Image

Image

And you’re back to square one.  I believe the dream sequence enters some kind of varying loop after a while.  Try it out the next time you’re feeling like an insomniac.  This was made by Rostlaub, a company that “combine[s] art, design, music, and state-of-the-art programming in a way you have never seen before.” That’s true. I’ll definitely be checking out their site again.

Source: Ana Somnia

Denmark has Giant Rainbow Glasses for Everyone

Throw out your Blublockers and come feast your eyes on Olafur Eliasson’s “Your Rainbow Panorama,” an interactive exhibit that tints Denmark’s skyline any shade of roy g biv depending on where you stand.  There should be one in every city!  The piece opened last May at the  ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum.

 

First-ever image of a single molecule (IBM)

Scientists Literally Reinvent the Wheel!

First-ever image of a single molecule (IBM)

First-ever image of a single molecule (IBM)

According to BBC news,  researchers really have reinvented the wheel by creating the tiniest vehicle, ever, whose wheels are no more than chemical groups changing their shape to push the molecule forward.  Being so tiny, the car’s racked up more than 6 billionths of a meter for mileage after receiving 10 electric bursts from a fine point of metal that’s made up of only one or two atoms.

Anyone got some good ideas for how to put these things to use? 😉

Space is Infinitely Awesome, and all in CGI

I’m obsessed with the Discovery Channel’s “How the Universe Works,” because I’m convinced its the new Planet Earth, except its completely CGI based.  As I was watching, I was amazed at how computers have been instrumental to our understanding of the universe through their mathematical prowess and probability comprehension.  It’s so “easy” to recreate the formation of a planet through CGI because of programming such as particle simulations, so it’s very appropriate that Discovery decided to utilize CGI as the show’s main content.

As a whole, the animators do a “stellar” job of creating supernovas and black holes. Pun intended. And paired with the narrator’s suspenseful tone and dramatic music, you’ll be left quaking in your boots thinking of all the 4 billion ways our Earth could be meet its end. But you’ll also learn some reassuring things, like how Jupiter protects us from being hit by comets, and Earth has a magnetic field that protects us from sun farts. True story.

To get a taste of some of the cool things you’ll learn, check out this Cracked article: “The 6 Most Mind-Blowing Things Ever Discovered in Space.”

A sample poster designed by Ryan Roche, OFA Staff

Severe whining over Obama’s Unpaid Poster Commissioning

A sample poster designed by Ryan Roche, OFA Staff

A sample poster designed by Ryan Roche, OFA Staff

Whine whine whine.  Why has no one put any Rolling Stone articles up on White Whine?

The people over at Rolling Stone are freaking out about Obama’s solicitation for a design campaign poster–but why?

I mean, don’t get me wrong–I think we all understand the great irony of kicking off a jobs campaign with an unpaid poster…but still. Why would any administration dole out top dollar for a job when there are people who will do it for free?  It’s the same reason all our clothes are made in China and the same reason no one wants to take illegal immigrant workers’ jobs:

No matter how cheap you can get something for, there will ALWAYS BE SOMEONE TO DO IT FOR LESS.

In Obama’s case–free.  For Mike over at Mule Design, who was quoted in the article as estimating the project between $40,000 and $100,000 to do, I’m sorry…but that’s just ridiculous.  Talented designers do high-profile or promising jobs for free, just to get their name out there.  I’m going to go out on a limb and say it was worth it.

In case Rolling Stone hadn’t noticed (which they did, because they complain about it all the time), our nation is at a 9.1% unemployment rate which means that artists, usually starving, are still starving and nothing has really changed for them.  Artists will always create for free.